The Faith Train

July 13, 2013

The Faith Train

            Every believer needs to travel daily on the faith train.  The fare (which is faith) is more costly for some than for others. For all, the price keeps changing from day to day.  It’s impossible to live without faith.  To be without faith is to be without hope.  In some ways, everyone lives by faith.  Those who have a job have faith that they will be paid for the work they do.  You mail a letter with faith that it will be delivered.  Faith is involved in much of what we do every day.

God expects that his people will have faith that goes beyond that of everyone else.  Hebrews 11:6 says, “But without faith it is impossible to please him: for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him.”  Romans 1:17 says, “as it is written, The just shall live by faith.” The obedient believer puts faith in the promises of God.  Philippians 4:19 says, “But my God shall supply all your need according to his riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” Some have to trust in God for their daily bread.  Even those who have a steady income need to trust in God for some things.  That’s why the ticket to travel on the faith train is more costly for some.

For all of us, there are days when we have to face a series of uncertainties.  On those days we pay more to travel on the faith train.  When the fare goes up there is the temptation to say “I won’t travel on the train today.” We stop trusting in God and start trusting in ourselves.

In the Bible we find examples of men who needed to have great faith in God.  Abraham was one of those men.  God ask him to leave his home land and loved ones without knowing where he was going.  In Romans 4:20-21 we read about his faith. “He staggered not at the promise of God through unbelief; but was strong in faith, giving glory to God;    and being fully persuaded that, what he had promised, he was able also to perform.” Later Abraham and his wife had to trust in God for a son.  Noah was another man who had great faith in God.  He was told to build an ark to save his family from a coming world-wide flood.  He was convinced that God meant what he said when he threatened to judge the earth with a flood because of man’s sin and unbelief.  Before that, there hadn’t been any floods; in fact, it hadn’t even rained!  Never the less, Noah spent 100 years on the faith train, building that ark and preaching to warn men of the coming judgment.

These men set an example in being persistent in their faith.  God tells us that we too should be persistent.  Galatians 6:9 says, “And let us not be weary in well doing: for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.”  In the Bible we read that God rebuked some for being weak in faith.  “O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt?”  (Matthew 14:31).  Others were praised because they had much faith.  “Then Jesus answered and said unto her, O woman, great is thy faith: be it unto thee even as thou wilt. And her daughter was made whole from that very hour” (Matthew 15:28).

How is your faith?  Are you often tempted to get off the faith train?  Maybe you never got on.  You get on the first time by recognizing that you are a sinner and asking God to forgive you and accept you as one of his children.  John 1:12 says, “But as many as received him, to them gave he power to become the sons of God, even to them that believe on his name.”

Maybe you were on and got off because you didn’t have enough faith.  Just because the ticket is costly isn’t a good reason for not getting on the train.  It’s reason for trusting more in the “exceeding great and precious promises” of God  (II Peter 1:4).  God is all powerful.  Nothing is impossible with him.  “And God is able to make all grace abound toward you; that ye, always having all sufficiency in all things, may abound to every good work” (II Corinthians 9:8).

Our E-mail address is rusandmargaretgeorge@windstream.net

 

 

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