How To Pray For Your Pastor

February 25, 2015

                                                                   How To Pray For Your Pastor

After having spent some 40 years in the ministry, I have seen the need of being upheld in prayer. You can be a tremendous help to your pastor by praying for him. He needs your prayers. This article was written to encourage you to pray for your pastor and help you know better how to pray for him.

God is jealous of his servants. We are in danger of suffering the chastisement of God if we unjustly criticize them. A pastor is a public servant. If he makes mistakes, it’s very possible that some of them will be made in public. They are there for everyone to see. If he does things that don’t meet with your approval, your first duty is to pray that he will improve in that area. If you think it is serious enough, you might want to schedule an appointment and talk to him. If you do, be gracious and humble. Galatians 6:1 tells you how to do it. “Brethren, if a man be overtaken in a fault, ye which are spiritual, restore such an one in the spirit of meekness; considering thyself, lest thou also be tempted.” First of all, express your appreciation for him. A good psychological approach is to say two or three good things about someone before you touch on one negative thing.   If your pastor is humble, he will greatly appreciate it if you talk to him in this way. He will no doubt thank you for coming. People have approached me about things I wasn’t doing right and I have appreciated it and thanked them for it.

Being a pastor is a divine calling. He is called to do a work that demands qualities of character that not all men have. They are qualities that must be developed and maintained. Pray that he will continue to have those qualities. Pastors are human. They are nearly always weak in some areas. Pray especially that he will improve in those areas.

Being a missionary has brought me in contact with a number of pastors. Many times I have sat across from their desk and listened as they poured out their heart to me. Sometimes they have shared with me things they wouldn’t feel free about sharing even with their deacons. They have told me about temptations they have faced that most men never face.

Sometimes women lack discretion and put their pastor in an awkward situation. Sometimes they appear unannounced at the door of the pastor’s study when he is there alone. They may have tears in their eyes and request counsel about a problem they are facing. They need and want an answer, now. What does he do? Does he turn her away and ask that she come back later when his wife is there? Pray that your pastor will know what to do when he finds himself in an awkward situation.

Pastors need to have a spirit of meekness. Ephesians 4:1-2 says, “I therefore, the prisoner of the Lord, beseech you that ye walk worthy of the vocation wherewith ye are called,

with all lowliness and meekness, with longsuffering, forbearing one another in love.” The meek are willing to seek and accept counsel and correction. Sometimes the pastor can get direction from the deacons. At other times he needs to seek out the counsel of an older pastor who has had more experience. Pray that your pastor will find the support, counsel and encouragement he needs.

Many pastors have a family. Their ministry can be effected, even hurt, by the behavior of their wife and children. When you pray for your pastor, pray also for his wife. Just as it takes a special kind of man to be a pastor, it also takes a special kind of woman to be a pastor’s wife. If the pastor’s children are rowdy, inconsiderate and undisciplined, some will hold that against him. Pray that your pastor will take the time he needs for his family and train his children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord. I Timothy 3:4-5 says that a pastor must be “One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity;   (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)”

We must realize that children are human. They don’t always behave perfectly. Satan often attacks a pastor through his children. If you think the pastor’s children are doing something behind his back, perhaps you should tell him about it. The same holds true for other parents in the church. Some pastors have been good parents, but still their children are a disappointment to them. Be understanding and forgiving.

A danger a pastor faces is that of neglecting his relationship with the Lord. Sometimes the duties of his family and the congregation demand so much of his time that he doesn’t have enough time to spend with God. Pastors find themselves under extreme pressure when their church is in a building program. Architects and building contractors are demanding his time, as well as the people of the church. He often feels as though there aren’t enough hours in the day to do all he needs to do. Pray that your pastor will know how to use his time wisely and give priority to that which is most important.

Something we appreciate in a pastor is his love for the people and his patience with them. His love and patience is best maintained by having a good relationship with the Lord. His love and patience can also be hindered if some in the church get upset with him and leave the church because he preaches against sin and doesn’t approve of their life style. Pastors are often under stress. Pray that your pastor will go on loving, even those who criticize him.

These are just some of the burdens your pastor bears. Pray that he will not be deficient in the qualities that make him a good pastor. Some of them are mentioned in II Timothy 2:24-26. “And the servant of the Lord must not strive; but be gentle unto all men, apt to teach, patient,  In meekness instructing those that oppose themselves; if God peradventure will give them repentance to the acknowledging of the truth;   And that they may recover themselves out of the snare of the devil, who are taken captive by him at his will.”

If you have questions or comments they can be sent to us at the following address: rusandmargaretgeorge@windstream.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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